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OPINION: Crowd funding, taxes, austerity and the failure of governments — 13 Comments

  1. Very well said Britt! Sooke is very fortunate to have you as a citizen and to have you reporting the real news!
    Let’s bring back the community to this and all communities and let’s keep the pressure on our governments to look after the people citizens, not the “corporate cutizens”!

  2. Well Britt, as you know a little about my situation. I have been absence from Facebook for a couple months now. Reason being our family was has been dealing with the 2 month diagnosis of our mom having cancer and then taking her life as well as having to deal with our (S.D.L.) business.

    However back to the article (I do so much enjoy the reading of (S.P.N.). This article struck to the core. Let me eleborate.

    The district of Sooke has done very little to encourage the use of fundraising for local food bank of scrap metal from Sooke Disposal and the great people contributing to this fundraiser. (In year 2013 this fundraiser raised over $5500 for local food bank, but instead of district encouraging this. They decided to send documents stating that Sooke Disposal was in contravention of zoning bylaw. Sooke Disposal was not in contravention of that by law. Simply because the scrap metal bin for recycling was on public utilities lands and ministry of highways land. We thought this was the good of all. However, the district did not instead they proceeded with legal action against Sooke Disposal stating we are running a waste/recycle station there. (Absolute false). This happened when my sister in law (brother/partner in S.D.l.) was fighting cancer. (R.I.P. Deb). So instead of the stress/emotional disbelief we seized this program so we could try and grief. Sooke Disposal then decided to protest for a solution for this and the homelessness of a 30 year old local company. A offer was put forth to council as we lobbied for a yard on Sooke Rd/Kaltasin rd outside the district owned workers yard.
    The offer was simply $2000 a month for three years $72,000 with all proceeds going to local food bank and none of the current tenants having to leave. Instead a an councilor acting as mayor decided to endorse a neighboring property which does not have the zoning. (However, the district has taken legal action since and continues too. Yet it is still open today, go figure. So when all of us talk about paying it forward, donating, volunteering, etc, our even entrepreneurs. We need to look no further then local government. As I said before Britt…this is a very significant story to tell readers about a 30 year old local company, a 30 plus year old community minded/family in Sooke, and a 16 year old municipality. I know I, will never loose faith in people. Enjoyed the article. Hope the truth does not offend anyone.

    Together We Can!

  3. Thank you Britt! Excellent ‘opinion’ piece (why is it when one person/citizen presents FACTS, those FACTS are deemed an ‘opinion’?)

    I live in Sooke. This is my community. I live here and I want to work here too (I work in Langford). Even though I can’t afford to shop here, I do anyway because I want my meagre dollars to stay in Sooke. I do whatever I can, whenever I can to support local people and businesses. I believe you’re right, “Crowd Funding” and “Charity” are government addictions that help offload responsibility. One-person-at-a-time does NOT address the underlying issues. The gov’t (regardless of the party) is elected to represent the people so it should always be people before profits.

  4. Well written and much food for thought, Britt. I do think crowd funding can be a great source of support for many people and are great in that they allow the money to filter to the source instead of paying the administrative (third party) costslike many charitable organizations have to do but I agree wholeheartedly that crowdfunding only works if you have a strong voice promoting your “cause” and that people who are silent will continue to go unnoticed.

    One thing that I have also wondered about crowdfunding is how this impacts overall donations being provided to charitable organizations each year. I know that I donate to as many causes as I can afford but have found that the bulk of my donations over the past year or 2 have gone to crowdfunding type situations instead of charitable organizations so I do not benefit from the tax incentives associated with charitable organizations, and my usual organizations of choice, have not received the money I would have normally donated to them. I would be curious to know if others have noticed a difference in how they donate and if charitable organizations are in turn noticing a significant decrease in the amount of money they receive each year.

    Anyways, great article with lots of great points for people to ponder.

  5. Well written and much food for thought, Britt. I do think crowd funding can be a great source of support for many people and are great in that they allow the money to filter to the source instead of paying the administrative (third party) costs, like many charitable organizations have to do, but I agree wholeheartedly that crowdfunding only works if you have a strong voice promoting your “cause” and that people who are silent will continue to go unnoticed.

    One thing that I have also wondered about crowdfunding is how this impacts overall donations being provided to charitable organizations each year. I know that I donate to as many causes as I can afford but have found that the bulk of my donations over the past year or 2 have gone to crowdfunding type situations instead of charitable organizations so I do not benefit from the tax incentives associated with charitable organizations, and my usual organizations of choice have not received the money I would have normally donated to them. I would be curious to know if others have noticed a difference in how they donate and if charitable organizations are in turn noticing a significant decrease in the amount of money they receive each year.

    Anyways, great article with lots of great points for people to ponder.

  6. Lots of thought put into this, Britt and congratulations for being ballsy enough to say what you think, which by the way has merit. I am particularly incensed when tax cuts are given to corporations (especially off-shore) who can most afford it – especially when those large corporations have no interest, vested or otherwise in our communities or the people living in them – at whatever level. Please don’t stop being the voice to say: “but the Emperor is naked.”

  7. Very good piece. You vented for a lot of us.

    But if I may…I bring your attention to the use of “who.”

    While corporations may enjoy a legal definition of a “person” – WHO, as I was taught back when a tablet was a piece of slate and the stylus was chalk… is reserved for human beings.

    Countries are not who’s. Your favourite animal is not a who. Your favourite sports team is not a who even tho’ it is made up of human beings. And most certainly corporations are not!

    Picky picky picky? Some PEOPLE may think so but I’ll be damned if I’ll attach any HUMAN attributes to a corporation even tho’ it may enjoy legal standing as a person.

    Recently “For the first time in US history, a judge has granted two chimpanzees a petition – through human attorneys – to defend their rights against unlawful imprisonment, allowing a hearing on the status of “legal persons” for the primates.” http://bit.ly/1ObSEoP (It’s an interesting read)

    That – which – it …. but please…anything but WHO. It drives me to distraction.

    So… who’s on first? I dunno but it certainly ain’t monsanto. -_Q

  8. I’m not the biggest fan of left of center views, however, this is Canada and to have a relevant discussion on social issues we must always include all sides. This piece presents some views from the left, now I will present some from right of center.

    Just because some people have disposable income and yes, enough to donate to charities and crowd funding, does not mean they should be taxed more. My wife and I have worked hard to get where we are and we earn our money. We have acquired the education, skills and experience to justify our incomes and none of it was a hand out. We were once staving students and we got loans that we paid back, with interest, while we work our way up from the ground. I empathise with those who have made poor life choices and those whose families set them up for failure, but that doesn’t mean they should just get life served up to them, sucking off society like a leach. Suggesting that our disposable income should be taken from us because we have been successful in life to offset those who failed is ludicrous.

    One last thing. I’ve given thousands to various charities through the United Way and some of my peers have given away well into 6 figures over the years. There are worthy charities out there.

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