HomeNewsEleven Horse Chestnut trees will take root in the trail corridor between Church and Townsend on Wednesday Log in

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Eleven Horse Chestnut trees will take root in the trail corridor between Church and Townsend on Wednesday — 4 Comments

  1. I concur with Gail, trees are nice, there are other species that can be planted that don’t poison animals. Especially this site as it is a very popular dog walk. SEE BELOW:

    Horse Chestnut
    Additional Common Names: Buckeye
    Scientific Name: Aesculus glabra
    Family: Hippocastanaceae
    Toxicity: Toxic to Dogs, Toxic to Cats, Toxic to Horses
    Toxic Principles: Aesculin (a glycosidic saponin), other saponins
    Clinical Signs: Severe vomiting and diarrhea, depression or excitement, dilated pupils, coma, convulsions, wobbly
    If you suspect your pet may have ingested a potentially toxic substance, call the APCC at (888) 426-4435 or contact your local veterinarian as soon as possible.*
    * A $65 consultation fee may apply.

  2. However, deer and black bears relish the nuts and eat them when they are available.
    Designing landscape plans that do not attract bears will help to keep Sooke residents safe. … and Wildlife wild.
    A bears’ diet is made up of mainly vegetation and they are attracted to
    a variety of plants found in common landscaping plans. In order to prevent bear/human conflicts, landscaping with recommended plants that do not have fruits, berries, nuts or a strong scent
    is strongly encouraged. Striving to maintain safe separation between bear-use areas and residential areas can reduce bear/human conflict.

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