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This rigorous marine rescue training can take your breath away — 2 Comments

  1. Great writeup.

    I was also at this training and I was reminded of some valuable advice. Always, and I mean always wear your PFD (Personal Floatation Device).

    I am a bigger guy and so it is a challenge at the best of times to pull my own body weight. Add in clothing that is full of water, limbs that are quickly losing energy due to the cold water and the task became next to impossible for me. Not only that, but my team (also fatigued) were unable to lift me into the boat and required assistance from another crew. Near the end, almost every ounce of strength was gone form my limbs. I could barely stand.

    I’ve noticed a lot of kayakers/boaters/paddle boarders out there not wearing any floatation. Imagine falling out of a vessel and using what little energy you have just to get back to it. Now, factor in the cold water shock, loss of mobility/strength, and potentially rough seas. Getting back in your vessel could be impossible, hanging on long enough to be noticed and rescued could also be challenging.

    I am glad we train for this because it not only allows us to properly deal with the situation, but gives us good insight into those we assist. I want everyone to be safe, so please, wear your PFD.

  2. Great writeup.

    I was also at this training and I was reminded of some valuable advice. Always, and I mean always wear your PFD (Personal Floatation Device).

    I am a bigger guy and so it is a challenge at the best of times to pull my own body weight. Add in clothing that is full of water, limbs that are quickly losing energy due to the cold water and the task became next to impossible for me. Not only that, but my team (also fatigued) were unable to lift me into the boat and required assistance from another crew. Near the end, almost every ounce of strength was gone form my limbs. I could barely stand.

    I’ve noticed a lot of kayakers/boaters/paddle boarders out there not wearing any floatation. Imagine falling out of a vessel and using what little energy you have just to get back to it. Now, factor in the cold water shock, loss of mobility/strength, and potentially rough seas. Getting back in your vessel could be impossible, hanging on long enough to be noticed and rescued could also be challenging.

    I am glad we train for this because it not only allows us to properly deal with the situation, but gives us good insight into those we assist. I want everyone to be safe, so please, wear your PFD.

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